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Arts in Exile - Virtual Exhibition and Network

Arts in Exile is a virtual exhibition which is devoted to arts created under the conditions of exile. Its aim is to highlight exile in all its complexity as experienced by artists, embedding it firmly within the contemporary German culture of remembrance.

The German Exile Archive 1933-1945 of the German National Library was requested by the former German Commissioner for Cultural and Media Affairs, Bernd Neumann, in 2012 to assume overall responsibility for and coordination of the virtual exhibition. The technical and conceptual content planning of the virtual exhibition was conducted in conjunction with the agencies Iglhaut + von Grote and ]Init[ AG. The Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach was also involved from the outset in the conceptual development of the virtual exhibition and also helped devise its educational part. The project is explicitly conceived as a network project. Content and exhibits have been incorporated from more than 30 research institutions, archives, exhibition centres and initiatives from Germany and abroad.

The Arts in Exile project is also overseen by an advisory committee which includes Dr. Ingeborg Berggreen-Merkel, Prof. Doerte Bischoff, Prof. Dan Diner, Prof. Burcu Dogramaci, Abbas Khider, Dr. Ursula Langkau-Alex, Prof. Michaela Melián and Volker Weidermann.

It is planned to add further objects and contributions gradually over the coming years to ensure that the Arts in Exile project remains a dynamic and continuously growing exhibition.

www.arts-in-exile.de
Further information (available only in German)

5,000 years of media history online

The virtual "5,000 years of media history online" exhibition includes trenchant histories, pictures, films and sound recordings related to the 11 theme modules of the permanent "Signs – Books – Networks: From Cuneiform to Binary Code" exhibition. Alongside the thematic approach, the website also allows the content to be accessed via a timeline which links together all the key innovations, events and individuals which played a role in the development of the media. A glossary containing Twitter-length explanations of over one thousand terms provides help during virtual journeys through time. There is also a digital visitors' book for questions, opinions, suggestions. This puts visitors into direct contact with the creators of the exhibition.

http://mediengeschichte.dnb.de

100 Jahre Erster Weltkrieg

Items depicting everyday life and the media of the First World War are featured in the online "100 Jahre Erster Weltkrieg" exhibition. More than 200 media objects , including posters and war newspapers, illustrate the importance of mass media in relation to the War. Areas covered by the exhibition include propaganda and censorship. For instance, visitors can find out all about the role of children's and young people's literature in the propaganda machinery of the First World War. And ration cards and posters bear witness to the difficulties of day-to-day life in which simply finding basic essentials was a problem. The content can be accessed via the different theme areas, but there is also a time line which provides an overview of the sequence of events in the War. In addition there is a glossary explaining relevant terms.

http://erster-weltkrieg.dnb.de (available only in German)


"Reading Europe: European Culture through the book"

Each of the national libraries of Europe has digitised roughly 100 works from their respective countries and uploaded them to the Europeana for the virtual "Reading Europe: European Culture through the book" exhibition. Germany has contributed digitised versions of well-known literary works by German authors from different centuries to "Reading Europe". Print editions held by the Library have been digitised; all royalties have been paid in each case, not only to the authors themselves but also to other contributors such as illustrators or foreword writers, for instance. "Reading Europe" features roughly 1,000 works in 32 languages. The exhibition includes the first edition of "Don Quixote" in Spanish, Goethe's "Faust" in German and Dostoyevsky's "The Idiot" in Russian.

Last update: 25.03.2015



Exhibitions / Leipzig

Bildfabriken. Infografik 1920–1945. Fritz Kahn, Otto Neurath et al.

A temporary exhibition of the German Museum of Books and Writing of the German National Library
8 September 2017 – 7 January 2018
Opening hours: Tuesday to Sunday 10:00 – 18:00, Thursday 10:00 – 20:00, public holidays 10:00 – 18:00
Free admission
Further information

"Brausepulver im Nachtgeschirr" – 100 Jahre Humor in Deutschen Zeitschriften

An exhibition in the safe of the German Museum of Books and Writing in the annex building of the German National Library
21 May 2017 - 30 September 2017
Opening hours: Tuesday to Sunday 10:00 - 18:00, Thursday 10:00 - 20:00, public holidays 10:00 - 18:00.
Free admission

Signs - Books - Networks: From Cuneiform to Binary Code

A permanent exhibition of the German Museum of Books and Writing in the annex building of the German National Library
Opening hours: Tuesday to Sunday 10:00 - 18:00, Thursday 10:00 - 20:00, public holidays 10:00 - 18:00.
Free admission

Virtual exhibition "5,000 years of media history online"

"Exhibition of historical sound recordings and reproduction equipment"

from the holdings of the German Music Archive, in the Music Foyer
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday 10:00 - 18:00. Closed: Sundays and public holidays.
Free admission

Last update: 10.08.2017



Exhibition / Frankfurt am Main

Permanent exhibition of the German Exile Archive 1933-1945 // In progress

After the transfer of power to the National Socialists in 1933 about half a million people fled from the German-speaking area to escape disenfranchisement, exclusion and persecution. With its collection of exile publications, personal literary estates and holdings from various institutions, the German Exile Archive 1933-1945 of the German National Library is dedicated to safeguarding and preserving works and historical testimony from this time.

After holding numerous temporary exhibitions and setting up the globally accessible Arts in Exile virtual exhibition, the Archive has now redesigned the permanent exhibition area to provide a permanent base for exploring the topic of exile.

In various thematic chapters, the exhibition will focus on exile from 1933 to 1945 in all its diversity. At the same time it will call for an increased attention to detail and for history to be represented from multiple perspectives. This will allow visitors e.g. to take a biographical approach when exploring the exhibition. The paths into exile and the resulting experiences were highly diverse depending on the time of escape, the receiving country and the individual situation. Another aspect of the exhibition highlights the importance of the archive as a place where history is collected, organised and made accessible.

In the age of global refugee movements, the permanent exhibition of the German Exile Archive 1933-1945 is taking a broad view of the term exile and providing a basis for exploring current issues, too.

Last update: 21.12.2016

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